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Mentone Girls' Grammar School | Kerferd Library

War Poetry: Poetic forms & terms

Year 10 English | Language [VCELA] Literature [VCELT]

Source: Four Canadian soldiers, sleeping and writing letters in the trenches near Willerval. (IWM, 2019).

Level 1 resource"The ‘war poet’ and ‘war poetry’, observed Robert Graves in 1942, were ‘terms first used in World War I and perhaps peculiar to it’. From Anglo-Saxon times to the Boer War, war poetry in English was written largely by civilians and did not have a clearly defined identity; with the extraordinary outpouring between 1914 and 1918, it established itself as a genre and the soldier-poet became a species." (Das, 2014)

Referencing Notice Don't forget to cite and reference your sources. For help see the Junior School or Senior School referencing guides, and / or CiteMaker.
Resource Key

When accessing content use the numbers below to guide you:

LEVEL

Brief, basic information laid out in an easy-to-read format. May use informal language. (Includes most news articles)

LEVEL

Provides additional background information and further reading. Introduces some subject-specific language.

Level 3 resourceLEVEL

Lengthy, detailed information. Frequently uses technical/subject-specific language. (Includes most analytical articles)

General Capabilities
Enduring Understandings
  • Students will understand that poetry is a deliberate form of language where structural and linguistic features combine to create meaning.
  • Students will understand that the poetry of war has a long tradition in literature.
  • Students will understand that meaning may change depending on the context, culture and linguistic understanding of the reader.
Essential Questions
  • How is poetry different to prose?
  • How can we create meaning with language?

Jump toJump to: Introduction > For individual forms and terms jump to E | I | M | P | Q | R | S | T

War Poetry | Poetic forms & terms: Introduction

Level 1 resourceArticlesPoetic forms relate to the physical structure of the poem while poetic terms are the devices poets use when writing their poems. Following is a list of common poetic forms and devices found in war poetry. This is not a definitive list. 

NOTE: If prompted use your mConnect login to access the articles.

See also:

Elegy

Enjambment

Imagery

Irony

Level 1 resourceFilm and videoTo view this video on campus remember to first login to your school Google account using your mConnect username and password. Click here for more help on using YouTube on campus.

"At face value, the lines between verbal irony, sarcasm, and compliments can be blurry. After all, the phrase 'That looks nice' could be all three depending on the circumstances. In the final of a three part series on irony, Christopher Warner gets into the irony you may use most often and most casually: verbal irony. " (Warner, 2013)

Source

When using this video don't forget to cite and reference your sources. For more information and help see the Kerferd Library referencing guide and / or CiteMaker.
In text reference / citation:Warner (2013) or (Warner, 2013)
Bibliography / Reference list: Warner, C. (2013). What is verbal irony? - Christopher Warner [eVideo] TED-Ed. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/IiR-bnCHIYo

Metaphor

See also Simile

Level 1 resourceFilm and videoTo view this video on campus remember to first login to your school Google account using your mConnect username and password. Click here for more help on using YouTube on campus.

"How do metaphors help us better understand the world? And, what makes a good metaphor? " (Hirshfield, 2012)

Source

When using this video don't forget to cite and reference your sources. For more information and help see the Kerferd Library referencing guide and / or CiteMaker.
In text reference / citation:Hirshfield (2012) or (Hirshfield, 2012)
Bibliography / Reference list: Hirshfield, J. (2012). The art of the metaphor [eVideo] TED-Ed. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/A0edKgL9EgM

Metre / Meter

Motif

See also Theme

Personification

Quatrain

Refrain

Rhyme

Level 1 resourceFilm and videoTo view this video on campus remember to first login to your school Google account using your mConnect username and password. Click here for more help on using YouTube on campus.

"Humans are creatures of rhythm and repetition. From our breath to our gait: rhythm is central to our experience, and often brings us pleasure. We can find pleasure in the rhythm of a song, or even the rows of an orchard. Of course, too much repetition can also backfire. David Silverstein describes what poetic repetition is and why it works. " (TED-Ed, 2016)

Source

When using this video don't forget to cite and reference your sources. For more information and help see the Kerferd Library referencing guide and / or CiteMaker.
In text reference / citation:Silverstein (2016) or (Silverstein, 2016)
Bibliography / Reference list: Silverstein, D. (2016). The pleasure of poetic pattern [eVideo] TED-Ed. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/URuMb15CWJs

Simile

See also Metaphor

Stanza

Theme

See also Motif

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