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Mentone Girls' Grammar School | Kerferd Library

War Poetry: Overview

Year 10 English | Language [VCELA] Literature [VCELT]

Source: Four Canadian soldiers, sleeping and writing letters in the trenches near Willerval. (IWM, 2019).

Level 1 resource"The ‘war poet’ and ‘war poetry’, observed Robert Graves in 1942, were ‘terms first used in World War I and perhaps peculiar to it’. From Anglo-Saxon times to the Boer War, war poetry in English was written largely by civilians and did not have a clearly defined identity; with the extraordinary outpouring between 1914 and 1918, it established itself as a genre and the soldier-poet became a species." (Das, 2014)

Referencing Notice Don't forget to cite and reference your sources. For help see the Junior School or Senior School referencing guides, and / or CiteMaker.
Resource Key

When accessing content use the numbers below to guide you:

LEVEL

Brief, basic information laid out in an easy-to-read format. May use informal language. (Includes most news articles)

LEVEL

Provides additional background information and further reading. Introduces some subject-specific language.

Level 3 resourceLEVEL

Lengthy, detailed information. Frequently uses technical/subject-specific language. (Includes most analytical articles)

General Capabilities
Enduring Understandings
  • Students will understand that poetry is a deliberate form of language where structural and linguistic features combine to create meaning.
  • Students will understand that the poetry of war has a long tradition in literature.
  • Students will understand that meaning may change depending on the context, culture and linguistic understanding of the reader.
Essential Questions
  • How is poetry different to prose?
  • How can we create meaning with language?

War Poetry | Overview: Keywords

Level 1Keywords
Click on the terms to access a simple definition from the Oxford Dictionary online. 

Brotherhood, Disillusion, Hero, Home front, Patriotism, PropagandaResilience, Sacrifice, Shell shock, Traitor, Trench warfare

War Poetry | Overview: Introduction

Level 1 resourceFilm and videoTo view this video on campus remember to first login to your school Google account using your mConnect username and password. Click here for more help on using YouTube on campus.

"Dr Santanu Das gives an introduction to the poetry of the First World War, providing fascinating commentary on a range of topics, supported by literary manuscripts and historical footage. How do we define the genre of First World War poetry and what makes it unique? Why is war poetry so powerful and so effective at describing traumatic experiences? What are the limits of language -- can the experiences of war ever properly be communicated? Why do we still read the poetry of the First World War and how has this enduring legacy affected our overall understanding of World War One?" (British Library, 2014)

Source

When using this video don't forget to cite and reference your sources. For more information and help see the Kerferd Library referencing guide and / or CiteMaker.

In text citation: (Das, 2014) or Das (2014)
Bibliography / Reference list:Das, S. (2014). World War One Poetry. British Library. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/lrOsIeUt90Q

War Poetry | Overview: Articles

Level 2 resource

War Poetry | Overview: eBooks

Level 2 resourceClick on the following book covers to place a hold in the library catalogue or access the book online. If prompted, sign in with your School mConnect user name and password.

War Poetry | Overview: Online resources

Level 1 resourceWeb sites

War Poetry | Overview: Videos

Level 1 resourceFilm and videoTo view this video on campus remember to first login to your school Google account using your mConnect username and password. Click here for more help on using YouTube on campus.

"In honor of the Armistice centenary, immerse yourself in a rich visual experience of World War I through an artful interpretation of three soldier’s poems, ranging from a rousing calls-to-arms, to a sobering realistic nature poem, to a famous dramatization of terror and disillusionment. The Poetry Foundation and Manual Cinema present this animated short to bring these relevant poems to life." (Poetry Foundation, 2018)

Source

When using this video don't forget to cite and reference your sources. For more information and help see the Kerferd Library referencing guide and / or CiteMaker.

In text citation: (Poetry Foundation, 2018) or Poetry Foundation (2018)
Bibliography / Reference list:Poetry Foundation (2018). Three World War I Poems. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/VMkTo9u0Mjs

Level 3 resource

"A representative sample of English poetry of World War One is surveyed. War rhetoric and propaganda are examined and challenged in Wilfred Owen's "Dulce et Decorum Est" and "Strange Meeting." The relationship between home front and battle front is explored in Thomas Hardy's "Channel Firing," "In the Time of 'the Breaking of Nations,'" and "I Looked up From My Writing"; Edward Thomas's "Adlestrop"; and Siegfried Sassoon's "'Blighters.'" Isaac Rosenberg's "Louse Hunting" is discussed as a poem of ordinary experience in the trenches.

00:00 - Chapter 1. Wilfred Owen Poem: "Dulce et Decorum Est"
15:39 - Chapter 2. Thomas Hardy Poem: "Channel Firing"
23:44 - Chapter 3. Thomas Hardy Poem: "In the Time of 'the Breaking of Nations"
26:24 - Chapter 4. Thomas Hardy Poem: "I Looked Up From My Writing"
29:10 - Chapter 5. Edward Thomas Poem: "Adlestrop"
38:21 - Chapter 6. Siegfried Sassoon Poem: "Blighters'"
41:09 - Chapter 7. Isaac Rosenberg Poem: "Louse Hunting"
48:10 - Chapter 8. Wilfred Owen Poem: "Strange Meeting"
(Yale University, 2012)

Source

When using this video don't forget to cite and reference your sources. For more information and help see the Kerferd Library referencing guide and / or CiteMaker.

In text citation: (Hammer, 2012) or Hammer (2014)
Bibliography / Reference list: Hammer, L. (2012). World War I Poetry in England. Yale University. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/ggMmDCUYJ1o

"The futility and madness of the First World War was the spur for some of the most moving poetry ever written. This documentary traces the development of war poetry from Anglo Saxon times to the nightmare of the trenches and looks at the work of Rupert Brooke, Wilfred Owen and Siegfried Sassoon. The War Poets is introduced and narrated by Brian Blessed with literary analysis by Jon Stallworthy, the foremost authority on war poetry today." (Ovation, 1993)

Source

When using this video don't forget to cite and reference your sources. For more information and help see the Kerferd Library referencing guide and / or CiteMaker.
In text reference / citation: Ovation (1993) or (Ovation, 1993)
Bibliography / Reference list: Ovation (1993). The War Poets [eVideo]. Retrieved from https://clickv.ie/w/emnd

War Poetry | Curriculum alignment

Level 1Victorian CurriculumThis Mentone Girls' Grammar School LibGuide supports the following Victorian curriculum outcomes. 

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