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Mentone Girls' Grammar School | Kerferd Library

Volcanoes: Overview

Geography / Levels 7 and 8 / Geographical Knowledge / Landforms and landscapes | ACHGK050 | VCGGK121

Source: Black, S. (2019).

Referencing Notice Don't forget to cite and reference your sources. For help see the Junior School or Senior School referencing guides, and / or CiteMaker.
Resource Key

When accessing content use the numbers below to guide you:

LEVEL

Brief, basic information laid out in an easy-to-read format. May use informal language. (Includes most news articles)

LEVEL

Provides additional background information and further reading. Introduces some subject-specific language.

Level 3 resourceLEVEL

Lengthy, detailed information. Frequently uses technical/subject-specific language. (Includes most analytical articles)

General Capabilities
Enduring Understandings

Understand the causes of volcanoes and can recognise various types of volcanoes. Research one particular volcanic eruption in detail and explain its causes and effects.

Essential Questions

What forces shape volcanoes?

Volcanoes | Overview: Introduction

Level 1Articles

Level 2Datasets

Volcanoes | Overview: eBooks

Level 1 resourceeBooks

Level 2 resource

Volcanoes | Overview: Videos

Level 1 resourceFilm and videoUsing YouTube on campus help and instructionsTo view this video on campus remember to first login to your school Google account using your mConnect username and password. Click here for more help on using YouTube on campus.

"The cycle of lava as a destructive and constructive force, building the structure of volcanoes and powering their devastating impact." (Twig Education, 2012)

Source

When using this video don't forget to cite and reference your sources. For more information and help see the Kerferd Library referencing guide and / or CiteMaker.
In text reference / citation: Twig Education (2012) or (Twig Education, 2012)
Twig Education (2012). Geography Lesson: What is a Volcano?, [eVideo]. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/WgktM2luLok

"These rifts in the earth, spewing lava, gases and ash, are forces of nature that are both a blessing and curse for human civilization." (National Geographic, 2008)

Source

When using this video don't forget to cite and reference your sources. For more information and help see the Kerferd Library referencing guide and / or CiteMaker.
In text reference / citation: National Geographic (2008) or (National Geographic, 2008)
Bibliography / Reference list: National Geographic (2008). Volcanoes 101 [eVideo]. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/uZp1dNybgfc

"What are supervolcanoes, and how catastrophic can they be? Learn how supervolcanoes form, where supervolcanoes are located, and how their destructive capabilities can make way for new life." (National Geographic, 2018)

Source

When using this video don't forget to cite and reference your sources. For more information and help see the Kerferd Library referencing guide and / or CiteMaker.
In text reference / citation: National Geographic (2018) or (National Geographic, 2018)
Bibliography / Reference list: National Geographic (2018). Supervolcanoes 101 [eVideo]. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/kAlawvE8lVw

Volcanoes | Overview: Online resources

Level 2 resourceWeb sites

Volcanoes | Overview: Images

Level 2 resourceImages

Volcanism resulting from two different plate boundaries. 1) Convergent tectonic plate boundary, where oceanic crust is being subducted beneath another plate; 2) Divergent plate boundary where basaltic magma wells up into the spreading centre to create a ridge.

Composite volcanoes (or stratovolcanoes) are generally located along subduction zones, which are plate boundaries where one plate (usually composed of denser, oceanic crust) slides under the other (usually lighter continental crust). As the plate is subducted it takes with it some ocean sediments and water. As the subducting crust heats up these components enter the overlying mantle, helping to melt part of it and form magma that rises up to the surface forming a chain of volcanoes, known as a volcanic arc. The resulting magma is generally dioritic in composition and feeds andesitic (composite) volcanoes. Where plates are diverging (spreading apart) the solid molten mantle material, poor in silica and therefore basaltic in composition, begins to melt due to lower pressure, and wells up in the space between the plates. The result is a chain of volcanoes that produce Icelandic-style eruptions along the fissure.

Source: Geoscience Australia. (2018). Roach I & Bear-Crozier A (Eds.). Volcanoes Teacher notes and student activities (p. 21). Retrieved from https://ecat.ga.gov.au/geonetwork/srv/eng/catalog. search#/metadata/100760

Australian volcanoes

Australia has a chain of extinct volcanoes along the east coast formed between 16-35 million years (Ma) ago.

Source: Geoscience Australia. (2018). Roach I & Bear-Crozier A (Eds.). Volcanoes Teacher notes and student activities (p. 24). Retrieved from https://ecat.ga.gov.au/geonetwork/srv/eng/catalog. search#/metadata/100760

Volcanoes | Revisions and test your knowledge

Level 1 resource

Volcanoes | Curriculum alignment

Level 1Victorian CurriculumThis Mentone Girls' Grammar School LibGuide supports the following Victorian curriculum outcomes. Click on the links to explore more.

Australian Curriculum Alignment

Curriculum Metadata

Q. What is this? A. Australian education vocabulary metadata in RDF/XML format.

Volcanoes - Education Services Australia Ltd 2005-02-01T00:00:00 2012-12-19T02:42:02Z Dormant volcanoes Extinct volcanoes Volcanic vents Volcanicity Volcanologists Vulcanology 5.3 - BT Geodynamics removed. Extinct volcanos Valcano Volcanos Volcanoes

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