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Mentone Girls' Grammar School | Kerferd Library

Rights and Freedom: Overview

VCE History Unit 2 | Study 2: Challenge and change

Source: Left image - Police use dogs to attack a civil rights demonstrator during a march in Birmingham, Alabama, on May 3, 1963. Encyclopædia Britannica (2019). Right image - People tend to antiapartheid protesters who were injured by police in Sharpeville, South Africa, on March 21, 1960. Encyclopædia Britannica (2019).

Referencing Notice Don't forget to cite and reference your sources. For help see the Junior School or Senior School referencing guides, and / or CiteMaker.
Resource Key

When accessing content use the numbers below to guide you:

LEVEL

Brief, basic information laid out in an easy-to-read format. May use informal language. (Includes most news articles)

LEVEL

Provides additional background information and further reading. Introduces some subject-specific language.

Level 3 resourceLEVEL

Lengthy, detailed information. Frequently uses technical/subject-specific language. (Includes most analytical articles)

General Capabilities
Enduring Understandings

Students will understand how oppressions is formed through the means of government/social convention. Students will also understand how leaders, ideas, movements and events can transform a country from one of oppression into one of greater liberty and justice.

Essential Questions
  • How do governments control people?
  • Why do they control people?
  • How does an idea create a movement?
  • What circumstances lead to a popular movement?
  • How does a citizenry move against a powerful opposition?
  • What makes a good leader?
  • What morals and ethics underpin a successful movement?

Rights and Freedom | Overview: Keywords

Level 1Keywords
Click on the terms to access a simple definition from either the Oxford Dictionary online. The definitions for words and phrases marked with a hash # come from alternative sources.

Activism, Apartheid, Civil disobedience, Civil liberty, Civil rights, Human rights, Racism, Segregation

Rights and Freedom | Overview: Articles

Level 1 resourceArticles

Rights and Freedom | Overview: eBooks

Level 1 resourceeBookTo view the eBooks off campus follow the link. If prompted, sign in with your School mConnect user name and password.

Level 2 resource

Level 3 resource

Rights and Freedom | Overview: Online resources

Challenge and Change | Overview: Curriculum alignment

Level 1Victorian Curriculum and Assessment AuthorityArea of Study 2: Challenge and change
  • "What were the significant causes of challenge to and change in existing political and social orders in the second half of the twentieth century?
  • How did the actions and ideas of popular movements and individuals contribute to change?
  • What impacts did challenge and change have on nations and people?"
Key knowledge
  • conditions and events that gave rise to the challenge and change to power
  • the ideas that influenced the challenge and brought about change
  • key individuals and/or groups involved in the movement for change
  • the methods employed by groups and individuals to implement change and express views, such as diplomacy, meetings and marches, civil disobedience, armed conflict, hijackings, bombings
  • the responses of established political and social orders, both positive and negative
  • conditions and events that gave rise to the challenge and change to power
  • the ideas that influenced the challenge and brought about change
  • key individuals and/or groups involved in the movement for change
  • the methods employed by groups and individuals to implement change and express views, such as diplomacy, meetings and marches, civil disobedience, armed conflict, hijackings, bombings
  • the responses of established political and social orders, both positive and negative the extent to which goals were achieved and change occurred
  • the short- and long-term consequences of particular events and movements
  • the key concepts that underpinned challenge and change in the period: decolonisation, nationalism, theocracy, self-determination, racism, sexism, feminism and egalitarianism.
Key skills
  • use questions to shape historical inquiry into arguments for change
  • explain the historical significance of particular movements, people and events
  • analyse continuity and change in particular contexts involving power relationships
  • explain the causes and consequences of movements and events
  • explain the beliefs, values and attitudes of people as reflected in primary sources
  • compare the perspectives of people from the period on political, economic and social change
  • compare historical interpretations about events of the period
  • construct arguments about the nature of particular social and cultural movements using primary sources and historical interpretations as evidence.

Victorian Certification of Education, History, Study Design 2016-2020 (Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority, 2015, p. 28-29.)

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